AN ASSESSMENT OF THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND OPERABILITY OF THE WORLD’S LARGEST AUTOGENOUS GRINDING MILLS AT BOLIDEN’S AITIK MINE

*ADAM MCELROY1, MALCOLM POWELL2, JAN TILLBERG1, MARKO HILDEN2, MOHSEN YAHYAEI2, MATTI LINNA3 & ANNA JOHANSSON3

1BolidenMineralFinnforsvägen 4SE-936 81 Boliden, Sweden

2University of QueenslandJulius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre (JKMRC)40 Isles Road, IndooroopillyBrisbane, Queensland, Australia, 4068

3Boliden AitikSakajärvi 1SE-982 92 Gällivare, Sweden (*Corresponding author: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.)

SAG Conference Vancouver, Canada September 22 – 26, 2019

ABSTRACT

The new Aitik autogenous grinding (AG) milling circuit was based on the successful original milling plant at Aitik, with a focus on low life-of-mine operating costs. At the heart of this is eliminating steel grinding media, maximizing the use of gravity flow, and using spiral classifiers instead of hydrocyclones. The two 22.5 MW AG mills, 11.6 metres (m) (38 feet [ft]) diameter by 13.7 m (45 ft) long, are the largest mills by volume operating in the world. Each AG mill feeds a 10 MW pebble mill via a unique coupling of flow and pebble feed with the pebble mill product recycling to the spiral classifier that is closed with the AG mill. The massive size of the AF circuit and unique layout make this an interesting case study in alternative plant layout and operation compared to the strong trend towards finer feed, high ball load and multiple ball mills per semi-autogenous grinding (SAG) mill. Operating capability, data on specific energy, throughput, and plant stability are presented as a comparative case study.

Keywords


Autogenous milling, pebble mill, spiral classifier, grindcurves, energy efficiency

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